Network Design

Simulate

Evaluate different business scenarios and get a clear picture of the impact each one would have on logistic costs and capacities across the supply chain.

Optimize

Identify the optimal number, size and location of manufacturing and warehousing facilities, as well as the best flow between them to achieve the desired service level at the lowest possible cost.

Analyze

Obtain the necessary information to support the decision-making process when it comes to changes to the supply chain.

Plan

Find out at what points in time and in which locations capacity will be compromised, what investments need to be made to prevent this and when.

Inventory Optimization

Optimize

Define the optimal inventory levels for each location-sku combination based on their specific supply and demand characteristics.

Increase Service Levels

Achieve better service levels by identifying the key products and locations where safety stock needs to be strengthened in order to accomplish the desired availability.

Reduce Inventory

Decrease your average inventory levels and free up working capital, improve storage space availability and reduce inventory losses.

Improve

Improve critical financial ratios by achieving equal or higher sales with less capital tied up in inventory.

S&OP Process

Integrate

Bring together plans and visions from different areas of the organization and generate a single, realistic plan that everyone can work towards.

Align

Develop plans that are in line with the company’s strategy and goals.

Optimize

Make the best possible use of available resources to fulfill demand in the most cost-effective way.

Respond

Proactively identify changes in economic trends and market conditions, consider different scenarios and manage your plans to react accordingly.

SCOR

Evaluate

Assess the current state of you supply chain’s performance by measuring it within a standard, tried-and-true framework.

Gain Insight

Improve your understanding of your supply chain and identify key areas of opportunity.

Improve

Take your supply chain to the next level by improving your processes based on a set of best practices refined by dozens of major organizations and applied in multiple initiatives.

Continuos Improvement

Perfect

Fine-tune your processes to account for operational elements that may not have come up during the design phase.

Adapt

Adjust to ever-changing market conditions and ensure that your processes are always in line with the realities of the business environment.

Impact

Generate a real, measurable impact on business results through increases in efficiency and service levels as a result of the continuous improvement of processes.

SCM Change Management

Align

Identify stakeholders at every level of the organization and ensure that their specific inputs and concerns are properly taken into account.

Communicate

Find key audiences and develop a plan in which the main messages are defined for each one, as well as the best possible channel to relay this information.

Prepare

Get your organization ready to face new challenges and deal with the unexpected setbacks that are an inevitable part of every change process.

Succeed

An inability to embrace change is one of the main reasons large implementations fail. Ensure that yours is a success story and make the most of your investment by having a plan in place to effectively deal with the changes to come.

Operating Model Deisgn

Improve

Identify stakeholders at every level of the organization and ensure that their specific inputs and concerns are properly taken into account.

Measure

Find key audiences and develop a plan in which the main messages are defined for each one, as well as the best possible channel to relay this information.

Plan

Get your organization ready to face new challenges and deal with the unexpected setbacks that are an inevitable part of every change process.

Prepare

An inability to embrace change is one of the main reasons large implementations fail. Ensure that yours is a success story and make the most of your investment by having a plan in place to effectively deal with the changes to come.

Kiazen Methodology

Identify an Opportunity

Step is having a better understanding of problems. What are the problems you are referring to? In order to identify what those problems are, share with your team the gaps identified above.

PDCA Cycle (Plan-Do-Check-Act)

Plan = The planning phase involves assessing a current process, or a new process, and figuring out how it can be improved upon. Knowing what types of outputs that are desired helps to develop a plan to fix the process. It is often easier to plan smaller changes during this phase so that they can be easily monitored and the outputs are more predictable.
Do = The do phase allows the plan from the previous step to be enacted. Small changes are usually tested, and data is gathered to see how effective the change is.
Check = During the check phase, the data and results gathered from the do phase are evaluated. Data is compared to the expected outcomes to see any similarities and differences. The testing process is also evaluated to see if there were any changes from the original test created during the planning phase.
Act = If the check phase shows that the plan phase which was implemented in do phase is an improvement to the prior standard (baseline), then that becomes the new standard (baseline) for how the organization should act going forward.

5 WHYS?

Is an iterative interrogative technique used to explore the cause-and-effect relationships underlying a particular problem.[1] The primary goal of the technique is to determine the root cause of a defect or problem by repeating the question “Why?” Each answer forms the basis of the next question. The “5” in the name derives from an anecdotal observation on the number of iterations needed to resolve the problem.

Implement The Solution

Is the alternative version of the act phase. Once PDCA has been run multiple times, the process generally has enough information for it to be considered a new standard. This is usually completed in the act phase. The adjust phase allows the process to continue to be monitored after the changes have been implemented and fix them accordingly. Doing this lets the PDCA cycle truly be for continuous improvement instead of changing a process and letting it become inefficient again.

Study The Results

Iterating towards an improved system, hence PDCA should be repeatedly implemented in spirals of increasing knowledge of the system that converge on the ultimate goal, each cycle closer than the previous.

Six Sigma and Lean Manufacture

DEFINE - Though Process Map (TMAP)

A TMAP can be used to drive specific actions and select the Six Sigma tools that should be employed. It is a living document that will change throughout the project and has no set format.

Suppliers Inputs Process Outputs Consumers (SIPOC)

It is similar and related to process mapping and ‘in/out of scope’ tools, but provides additional detail. The tool name prompts the team to consider the suppliers (the ‘s’ in SIPOC) of your process, the inputs (the ‘i’) to the process, the process (the ‘p’) your team is improving, the outputs (the ‘o’) of the process, and the customers (the ‘c’) that receive the process outputs.Act = If the check phase shows that the plan phase which was implemented in do phase is an improvement to the prior standard (baseline), then that becomes the new standard (baseline) for how the organization should act going forward.

MEASURE - Process Map (PMAP)

Process Maps are detailed flow diagram of the process using color coded symbols that drill further into the high level map generated on the SIPOC. The purpose is to visually represent the process as it is in reality.

Value Stream Map (VSM)

Value stream mapping is a paper and pencil tool that helps you to see and understand the flow of material and information as a product or service makes its way through the value stream. This is especially helpful when working to reduce cycle time, because you gain insight into the decision making flow in addition to the process flow. It is actually a Lean tool.

ANALYZE - Failure Model Effects Analysis (FMEA)

FMEA is a qualitative and systematic tool, usually created within a spreadsheet, to help practitioners anticipate what might go wrong with a product or process, and then to create plans to mitigate the risk of failure.

Numerical Evaluation Metrics (NEM)

Another name for control charting focusing on the idea rational subgrouping, that is using changing subgroups to evaluate a process.

IMPROVE - Measurement System Evaluation (MSE)

Measurement systems analysis takes the Six Sigma concept to a whole new level by identifying potential sources of errors like bias, discrimination, environment, damage, repeatability and reproducibility, variation due to method of use, appraiser issues, linearity and stability.

CONTROL - Control Plan (PC)

The intent of a process control plan is to control the product characteristics and the associated process variables to ensure capability (around the identified target or nominal) and stability of the product over time. Every completed Six Sigma project should have not only a control chart (if applicable), but a control plan. This ensures that the process doesn’t revert to the way it previously operated.

Demand Driven MRP

Strategic Inventory Positioning

The most fundamental question to ask in today’s manufacturing environments is, “given our system and environment, where should we place inventory to have the best protection.

Buffer Profiles and Zones

DDMRP calls for the grouping of parts and materials chosen for strategic replenishment and that behave similarly into “buffer profiles.” Buffer profiles take into account important factors including lead time (relative to the environment), variability (demand or supply), whether the part is made or bought or distributed and whether there are significant order multiples involved. These buffer profiles are made up of “zones” that produce a unique buffer picture for each part as their respective individual part traits are applied to the group traits.

Dynamic Adjustments

Dynamic buffer levels allow the company to adapt buffers to group and individual part trait changes over time through the use of several types of adjustments. Thus, as more or less variability is encountered or as a company’s strategy changes these buffers adapt and change to fit the environment.

Demand Driven Planning

Takes advantage of the sheer computational power of today’s hardware and software. It also takes advantage of the new demand-driven or pull-based approaches. When these two elements are combined then there is the best of both worlds; relevant approaches and tools for the way the world works today and a system of routine that promotes better and quicker decisions and actions at the planning and execution level.

Visible and Collaborative Execution

DMRP defines a modern, integrated and greatly needed system of execution for all part categories in order to speed the proliferation of relevant information and priorities throughout an organization and supply chain.

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